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Tarbela Dam

One dam a decade: The only way to water, power independence

LAHORE: Muzzamil Hussain, chairman Water & Power Development Authority (WAPDA), during his first year in the office zoomed in on one thing only and that was bringing as many otherwise ‘dead’ projects back to life as possible. These projects, despite having great economic value for the country, were lying in limbo for years even after consuming billions of rupees.

Water is what matters!

Hundreds of thousand people of Pakistan remain in constant danger of being suddenly hit by floods. In the past, their lands have been inundated, their homes washed away and those affected being forced to move away into an uncertain future. What could be worse than this unmitigated disaster? And yet one is forced to think: could this catastrophe have been avoided?

Water under the bridge

About Rs25 billion worth of water is wasted every year. That’s what the Wapda chairman reportedly told the Public Accounts Committee earlier this week. That is an understatement. Only about 10 percent of the available 145 million acre feet (maf) of water can be stored in existing reservoirs – global average is around 40 percent. Thanks to insufficient storage capacity and systemic losses, the waste is huge.

Pakistan eyes 2018 start for China-funded Diamer-Bhasha dam

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan expects China to fund a long-delayed Indus river mega dam project in Gilgit-Baltistan with work beginning next year, Planning Minister Ahsan Iqbal said in an interview.

Pakistan has been keen for years to build a cascade of mega dams along the Indus flowing down from the Himalayas, but has struggled to raise money from international institutions amid opposition from its nuclear-armed neighbor India.

Tarbela Dam water level reach at ‘dead level’

Tarbela: Water level of Tarbela Dam on Sunday has reached on dead level of 1380 feet, disclosed daily report of the dam. It said that water level of the dam is very critical; water inflow in the dam was 24300 cusecs feet while the outflow was 30000 cusecs feet and if the situation persists the outflow would decrease.
Officials have shut down five power generation plants whereas only seven are producing 500 MW electricity. The working units are not producing electricity with full capacity.

Water in Dams rising across Pakistan after dense rains

ISLAMABAD: Dams’ water across Pakistan have been raising after dense rains while Kabul River has come under low level flood on Wednesday, 24 News reported.

According to details, water storage in Tarbela Dam is 2 lacks, 13 thousand cusec of water while outflow of water is 90 thousand cusec of water. 1511, 87 feet water level has been reported in Tarbela Dam. Moreover, inflow of water in Mangla Dam is 3 lacks, 35 thousand and 710 cusec of water has been reported while outflow of water is 15 thousand cusec of water.

Climate Change Experts Urge Pakistan to Come Up with Water Management Policy

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan needs to formulate and implement a management policy for its water resources, which would soon be surpassing value of petroleum, says Prof Patrick Shea, former director of the US Bureau of Land Management.

In his lecture on “Relevance of Environmental Laws to Coping Climate Change” at the Sustainable Development Policy Institute (SDPI) on Tuesday, Shea said that establishing an institutional framework to handle the challenge had become all the more important, as Pakistan was turning from a water surplus to a water scarce country.

Water — Pakistan's Most Critical Challenge

Of all the challenges Pakistan is facing, water is the most critical. The country is among the leading five that face extremely high water stress and low access to safe drinking water and sanitation, according to the World Resources Institute.

Similarly, the United Nations categories Pakistan amongst those few unfortunate countries where water shortages could destabilize and jeopardize its existence in the next 10 years.

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